Chinese New Year

The Chinese New Year falls between the 21st January and the 20th February, and is the longest running festival in the Chinese Calendar. Small scale celebrations began c.2300BCE during the Neolithic, but it was not until the Shang Dynasty (c.1600-1050BCE) that New Years celebrations became a part of the year end religious ceremony. During the…

Archaeological Sites Used in Entertainment

Abu Simbel Temple, Egypt in The Mummy Returns Al Khazneh, Jordan in Indiana Jones: the last crusade Alnwick Castle, England in Harry Potter Dubrovnik, Croatia in Game of Thrones Hadrian’s Wall, England in Robin Hood: the prince of thieves   Ouarzazate, Morocco in Gladiator Paro Taktsang (Tiger’s Nest), Bhutan in Batman Begins Rosslyn Chapel, Scotland…

Stone Circles in the UK

  Stone circles were a part of a Neolithic and Bronze Age (c.3300 – 900 BCE) tradition in Britain. They are defined by a circle of standing stones, where the size and number of stones can vary. Stone circles were not specific to Britain however, with other examples being found on Continental Europe, in Africa,…

Roman Forts in the UK

  Roman Forts were used as a defensive military strategy. The plan made it easy for soldiers to have access to surrounding walls quickly. A large ditch was built around the outside. The dirt removed from the ditch would create a rampart and a wall was built on top of that. If you like it,…

Roman Amphitheatres in the UK

  When people think of great Roman amphitheaters, they tend to think of the Colosseum; the most well-known and world-renowned of them all. The truth is that more Roman Amphitheaters exist including many outside of Italy including France, Greece, northern Africa and England. Amphitheaters were large outdoor entertainment venues built by the Ancient Romans to…